Just Say Goodbye

A beautifully constructed emotional rollercoaster that manages to ebb into every facet of life as we know it.

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Jesse (Max MacKenzie) is a kid like no other, he has a drunk for a father and a mother who was a victim to suicide; and all this before the age of sixteen. His only saving grace in his ever-deteriorating existence is his best friend, Sarah (Katerina Eichenberger).

A film with suicide at its core is never an easy subject to breach, especially in the marketplace of independent productions. Though new(ish) to the film industry, the team behind this production manages to tackle this enormously complex labyrinth of feelings with such ease it’s as though Director, Matt Walting, has been constructing such wonderfully unique dynamics for years.

The actors too shine from start to finish, as their enthusiastic energy becomes an integral component of the film’s overall subtle sensibility, that engulfs the audience with captivating finesse.

For a film with such a limited budget, it has reached heights that rival even the big screen giants, clearing the way for a very successful awards season and even more successful future for Walting Entertainment.

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Darkest Hour

So many people to save, so little time.

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With an impossible task ahead, Winston Churchill is promoted to the role of Prime Minister, will little hope of resolve in the impending doom of WWII.

Gary Oldman takes center stage as Churchill to bring one of the greatest stories in recent history to the big screen, and I can think of no better man to do it.

A story as well known as this one is always somewhat difficult to reinvent and captivate, but director Joe Wright seems to have taken it in his stride, with the minor details becoming major details in this most unusual retelling of history.

What begins as a nose dive into a war engulfed Britain, soon becomes a noisy mess, as viewers are resigned to witness a slow slog of heavy dialogue, which makes this film feel like a long haul flight with no sign of any available parachutes.

Though this film may lag at points, the overall content provides an insight into one of the greatest minds this country has ever seen and reveals the baffling conflict of WWII politics, as the brunt of war is encrypted in secrecy.



Death is but the next great adventure; in a world full of life, the perils of death never seem too far away.

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Music is a bit of sore subject in Miguel’s family, which wouldn’t be a problem if he didn’t want to be a musician, but he does, and so it is.

In an act of rebellion, Miguel strikes at the core of his family’s morals and runs away in an attempt to enter a music competition on the day of the dead; unfortunately all does not go to plan and Miguel finds himself in the land of the dead amongst his ancestors with a lot of explaining to do.

Death is not a subject that many animators could tackle, but this Disney Pixar collaboration does so with so beautifully crafted precision that one almost forgets that death is at the heart of this majestically orchestrated animation.

From endearing characters to unapologetic honesty, the film breaches the gap between fantasy and reality with such effortless ease, you don’t even remember it happening.

This film is as important to the younger generation, as it is to the old, with the act of remembrance striking at the core of one’s very being.

No one wants to be forgotten, and this animated wonderland reinforces the importance of why.


Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle

The board game with a vengeance is back, and this time it’s gone digital.

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When a group of detention goers are tasked with the job of clearing up their schools’ basement, they come across a literal game-changer, as they are unexpectedly thrown into the world of Jumanji.

From badass teenagers to full-grown adults, somehow through the magic of this game, a young blonde girl turns into a middle-aged man, as Jack Black takes on the persona of a millennial teenage girl as each kid picks their gaming characters without much thought for the outcome. Which as is evidenced by Black’s awesomely hilarious portrayal of a young teenage girl, makes for great on-screen entertainment.

Rather than trying to restore the original Jumanji, this film pays homage to its predecessor as it keeps the magic of the story, but delivers it to a new audience with a reimagined direction.

The film is crammed with big names, from Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson to Karen Gillan, supplying audience goers with ample googling time, as the actors strut their stuff on the big screen in an adventure that will warm the hearts of viewers both young and old.



The Greatest Showman

A show that shoots for the stars, but hits the moon.

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P.T Barnum has an extraordinary need for greatness, but a not so extraordinary bank balance to match. What starts as a naive passion project soon escalates into one of the greatest shows in the world, as Barnum rallies the most unlikely of troops to put on a truly unique show.

With Hugh Jackman sitting front and center at the helm of this film as B.T. Barnum, and an equally impressive cast of supporting actors, from Zac Efron to Michelle Williams, this film certainly provides the talent to back this infamously impactful story of inequality and ambition.

Director Michael Gracey provides a backdrop that relishes the acting talent, as all components of this heartfelt and authentic film culminate to create a visionary dream that envisages a world without judgment, with music at its very core.



Stars Wars: The Last Jedi

‘We are the spark, that will light the fire that’ll burn the first order down’

-Poe Dameron-

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As the Star Wars saga grows with unequaled velocity, George Lucas finds a way to keep the ever impending doom at a distance that keeps audiences far and wide coming back for more galactic-fuelled excitement.

Death and destruction face the last of the rebel alliance in Lucas Film’s latest installment as Rey (Daisy Ridley) and Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) must both find their balance in determining the force to fulfill their destiny.

As per usual, the special effects on offer throughout the film, leave little to the imagination, as the audience are engulfed in all things space, from a near-miss fighter jet crash to phenomenal close-ups of the Millennium Falcone.

Though many new faces make a debut, many old come to an end, as this film marks the beginning of the end for the original star wars cast, whose teachings are graciously passed on to the new generation of rebels.

‘The Last Jedi’ not only gives hope for the future of this all-consuming franchise but gives audiences a story to fall back in love with all over again, courtesy of director Rian Johnson, who puts the ‘war’ back into ‘Star Wars’.




Life is a tough enough battle to fight as it is, but it becomes an uphill battle when societies concept of normalcy is comprised.

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August Pullman (Jacob Tremblay), is, in all other aspects of his life, a perfectly ‘normal’ 10-year-old boy, except for one small insignificant aspect; he doesn’t exactly look normal. Since his inception into this world, August has battled with a rare genetic disorder which resulted in facial abnormalities.

The film takes on Augusts’ struggles as he navigates his way through Middle School, and tackles unforgiving hardships on his way to igniting friendships.

Straight from the pages of R.J. Palacio’s book ‘Wonder’, director, Stephen Chbosky, doesn’t shy away from the unrelenting sadness of the storyline, but instead embraces it with both hands, showing August’s life as he retreats into the shadows and braves the light.

With Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson taking the lead roles as August’s parents, the film is able to create a feeling of deep empathy that reverberates through the audience and hits the pit of one’s heart, as the realization of impact for August’s family is nothing short of devastatingly beautiful.

This film is not only an important discovery for the unrealistic expectations of Hollywood cinema, but also provides an unwavering glimpse into societal perceptions, which are as far from accepting as can be.