Dunkirk

Historically magnificent, with visuals that show the true meaning of cinematic idealism; Christopher Nolan has certainly put a worthwhile dent in War dramas that will not be forgotten.

Image result for dunkirk film

From visually stunning landscapes showcasing the scale of the Dunkirk evacuation of 1940, to a low impact dialogue of acting, this film takes its audience back to a time that many have forgotten and leaves them winded with enthusiasm for the sheer scale of breathtaking film footage, that many film-makers could only dream off.

By using snippets of  numerous storylines to cover the impact that was felt by all involved, Nolan was able to construct a film that demonstrates the hurt and loss of such a large scale evacuation, whilst still showing the unbelievable strength of civilians who crossed the channel to rescue some of the 400,000 soldiers stranded on the beaches.

This is a film that will remain an important cinematic venture, showcasing a phenomenal piece of history that will go on to educate audiences both young and old.

 

Advertisements

Everything, Everything

Ripped from the pages of Nicola Noon’s bestselling novel comes a big screen coming of age production that is sure to warm the hearts of teenagers everywhere.

Image result for everything everything

Locked in her own house for the majority of her eighteen years existence, Maddy has become victim to SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency), essentially she’s allergic to everything. Maddy has come to accept her limited surroundings, that is until she falls in the love with Olly, the boy next door.

Though pitched as a typical teen flick, this film covers multiple emotions, from love, to loss and everything in between. Both actors, whilst fairly new to the acting scene manage to excel in their roles portraying every emotional goal expected of them. With Amandla Stenberg playing Maddy and Nick Robinson as Olly, it’s safe to say both these new faces have a hell of an acting career ahead of them.

The film itself was excellently converted from page to screen, using animations to explain the science behind Maddy’s disease and further animations to break down the building drama in certain scenes, making it accessible to audiences young and old.

For fans that are faithful to Noon’s written word, this film will be a pleasant representation of the original masterpiece.

Baywatch

As comedic crime drama beach spoofs go, this one is just as ridiculous as is to be expected.

Related image

A lifeguards work is never over, especially when you’re an LA County lifeguard, who’s roles apparently encompass the most unlikely of tasks such as undercover crime investigations; just another day at the beach for these guards.

Though David Hasselhoff and Pamela Anderson have had their characters upgraded in the form of Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson and Zac Efron, the basic premise is the same; everyone is astonishingly good looking and the beach crimes are as unrealistic as ever.

Despite an absolutely abysmal string of comedic slow-motion running scenes and face-palm worthy jokes, this film still manages to bring a smile to the faces of its begrudging audience.

The basic plot may be no different to its 1990s crime series counterpart and the special effects may have you cringing in your seats, but there is definitely something lovable about the sheer scale of this films ridiculousness.

King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

A classic tale is turned into an epic adventure as Guy Ritchie sprinkles it with a little magic.

Image result for king arthur legend of the sword

Though born into royalty, Arthur is brought up in poverty following his parents demise at the hands of his uncle, which leaves him unknowingly carrying greatness upon his shoulders.

Guy Ritchie does what he does best, casting his unique style into the direction of this film; as the plot builds, so does the speed of the action, exhilarating with such vigour, you leave the cinema feeling slightly windswept. But to counteract this feeling of excitement, Ritchie slows down scenes to highlight his classic slow-motion angles, creating stand-out moments at the heart of the action.

The soundtrack, too, is unnervingly accurate, keeping the audiences’ emotions in check throughout the action and into the emotion; as if you’d expect anything but brilliance from the director behind the Sherlock Holmes films.

Though having to withstand David Beckham’s attempt at ‘acting’ for  potentially the longest three minutes of our lives, the rest of the cast exceeds all expectations, showing of their numerous talents and living up to their household names.

Unlocked

CIA films never get old, but they do, apparently, get longer.

Image result for unlocked film

London is in a terror crisis, and it’s up to CIA agent, Alice Racine, to save the day. But as is the case with so many crime thrillers, such matters are never made easy.

In a plot twist that’s sure to make even Donald Trump double take, conspiracy theories get a whole new meaning as central intelligence gets a little less, well, intelligent.

With a cast that boasts the likes of Michael Douglas and Orlando Bloom, you can only hope for good things, but, alas, that’s about as good as this film gets; safe to say these two will be having harsh words with their management teams.

Despite the best efforts of the script-writers, this film just cannot get it’s feet off the ground, with each anti-climatic scene following the next, it’s a wonder there were so many cinema goers left in their seat by the time the end-credits rolled.

 

Their Finest

Authenticity, optimism and a dog; what else could you possibly need for a wartime film?

Image result for their finest poster

A married woman and screenwriter find themselves thrown together in a 1940 war-tired Britain as they are commissioned with the dubious task of creating a film worthy of American style propaganda.

Gemma Arterton and Sam Claflin take on the lead roles in this period drama, both of whom manage to fill their roles with heroic integrity and lighthearted humour. Whilst Bill Nighy claims a supporting role; a position which he fills with effortless talent and his ever-so-unique orchestra of hand movements.

The styling and costumes of both set and stars is conveyed with staggering ease, propelling the audience into 1940’s London with an instant glance.

The Direction too is nothing short of magnificent, but nothing else would be expected from Lone Scherfig, the director of similarly natured films such as An Education (2009) and The Riot Club (2014).

Though the story does have relentlessly unpleasant twists, the plot remains humble to its era and clearly everyone involved in the production has ensured the sincerity of the war remained an integral element.

Table 19

No wedding is complete without a little drama, and this wedding is no exception.

Image result for table 19

There’s always that one table at a wedding that is crammed full of weirdos who have been invited out pity, and that is the very subject of this film. Table 19, as you may have guessed by now, is that such table.

From a married couple in turmoil to a teenage boy who’s trying to bag himself a girlfriend, this table has it all.

Though the plot has a great concept behind it, it never seems to reach its full potential, which is no more helped by the often sloppy acting, which is only marginally saved by Anna Kendrick taking centre stage. 

A film that’s entire focus is narrowed to a single table within the wider environment of a wedding is a difficult task and, unfortunately, one that I cannot say was successfully achieved within this attempt, which at most could be described as an experimental defeat.