The Emoji Movie

With Sir Patrick Stewart as a poop emoji and James Corden as a Hi-5 emoji, what could possibly go wrong?

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The answer; Everything.

The very premise of this film was a ridiculous idea to begin with, but that didn’t stop Sony Pictures from making a heavy investment in it.

Despite the quite honestly bafflingly talented cast that have joined forces to voice this movie, the plot remains embarrassingly lack-lustre.

If it wasn’t for James Corden’s comforting British sarcasm that provides comic relief at all the right moments, this film would be a complete right-off.

Though the younger audiences will be falling over each other to reach this cinematic defeat, parents will find the experience headache ridden, but at least it might give them an opportunity for a nap.

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Rough Night

A bachelorette to remember, but all for the wrong reasons.

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When a group of girls get together to celebrate their friend’s bachelorette party, things soon go from bad to detrimental as the night quickly meets a very sticky end; that’s not a euphemism.

With Scarlett Johansson heading up this badass girl gang and the likes of Kate McKinnon shortly behind, the standard of acting is well above expectations.

The script too, delights with scenes that are cringeworthy in the best possible way. From inappropriate sex scenarios to using Advil in attempt to resurrect a dead body, this film delights in its ridiculousness.

Whilst the premise of this film is based upon whimsical futility, the film has a whole host of comedic goldmines that leave the audience in stitches of laughter.

 

Baywatch

As comedic crime drama beach spoofs go, this one is just as ridiculous as is to be expected.

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A lifeguards work is never over, especially when you’re an LA County lifeguard, who’s roles apparently encompass the most unlikely of tasks such as undercover crime investigations; just another day at the beach for these guards.

Though David Hasselhoff and Pamela Anderson have had their characters upgraded in the form of Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson and Zac Efron, the basic premise is the same; everyone is astonishingly good looking and the beach crimes are as unrealistic as ever.

Despite an absolutely abysmal string of comedic slow-motion running scenes and face-palm worthy jokes, this film still manages to bring a smile to the faces of its begrudging audience.

The basic plot may be no different to its 1990s crime series counterpart and the special effects may have you cringing in your seats, but there is definitely something lovable about the sheer scale of this films ridiculousness.

Snatched

Amy Schumer is the unlikely daughter of Goldie Hawn on a holiday they’ll never forget.

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Dumped by her boyfriend and eager for travel, Emily (Schumer) finds herself with a spare ticket for an Ecuadorian adventure, so decides to enlist her mother (Hawn) as her plus one; what could possibly go wrong?

Though an unlikely pairing, Schumer and Hawn gloriously unite to provide audiences with a comedic journey like no other. From escaping boobs to drunken shenanigans, not a minute goes by without a laugh, or at worst, a face-palm.

The plot, whilst obviously and completely ridiculous, manages to successfully convey its story whilst providing the much needed comic relief and a worryingly accurate representation of a mother-daughter relationship, which is unwavering in its honesty.

It may not be everyone’s cup of tea for its excessive use of dry humour, but it certainly checks most of the comedy genre boxes.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul

With the general reading age of the book being for ages 8-14, the page to screen adaptation was never destining for cinematic greatness.

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Essentially, a boy named Greg, accompanied by his family, go on a summer road trip together and disaster ensues. 

Yes, you would be right to think this is basically a PG version of We Are The Millers.

As you might expect with a film predominantly aimed at children, the acting is painstakingly awful and at times you could probably have a goat stand-in and it’d have more talent. 

The story is somewhat interesting at best, and the main comedy aspect is best seen from a parental perspective, which showcases how truly terrible and irritating children can be. 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Star-Lord and his troop are back to guard the galaxy against the most unlikely of predators.

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Since saving the planet and relinquishing their criminal reputations, the guardians have been busy freelancing their skills around the galaxy. But when Quill’s father makes an unexpected appearance, the team must put their business plans on hold.

Despite having a lot to live up to, as sequels go, this film truly does match expectations. The characters have been further developed and the special effects have been given a revamp. Rather than lagging behind, the story has been turbo-boosted with vigour, allowing for the characters to pursue their paths and continue their bond with the audience.

The acting, as is to be expected with such a star-studded cast, is beyond impressive, especially when taking into account the vast majority of it would have been done using green screen; they are in space after all.

What continues to amaze me the most about this franchise is the very fact that the creative team have been able make an audience fall in love with a CGI tree that says just three words: I am Groot.

 

 

 

Their Finest

Authenticity, optimism and a dog; what else could you possibly need for a wartime film?

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A married woman and screenwriter find themselves thrown together in a 1940 war-tired Britain as they are commissioned with the dubious task of creating a film worthy of American style propaganda.

Gemma Arterton and Sam Claflin take on the lead roles in this period drama, both of whom manage to fill their roles with heroic integrity and lighthearted humour. Whilst Bill Nighy claims a supporting role; a position which he fills with effortless talent and his ever-so-unique orchestra of hand movements.

The styling and costumes of both set and stars is conveyed with staggering ease, propelling the audience into 1940’s London with an instant glance.

The Direction too is nothing short of magnificent, but nothing else would be expected from Lone Scherfig, the director of similarly natured films such as An Education (2009) and The Riot Club (2014).

Though the story does have relentlessly unpleasant twists, the plot remains humble to its era and clearly everyone involved in the production has ensured the sincerity of the war remained an integral element.