Home Again

With a famous film director as a dad and a gorgeous actress as a mum, it’s no wonder Alice Kinney (Reese Witherspoon) has the weight of the world on her shoulders.

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Two children and a broken marriage later, Alice decides to move back to her hometown of Hollywood, but she gets a little more than she bargained for when her 40th birthday bash lands her with three new housemates; young and extremely handsome housemates.

This film follows the usual romantic-comedy guidelines; putting obstacles in the way of happiness until eventually, the lead finds her happily ever after.

But unlike most films, this one seems a little more organic in its execution, by ensuring the female lead, Reese Witherspoon in this case, doesn’t need a relationship to feel ‘worthy’ or ‘complete’. Which, admittedly, is a refreshing outlook given the countless needy romances already in the back catalog of this genre.

Though entirely generic, the film does at least make for easy-watching, with its occasional comedic sketch and the inevitable and all too often clumsy-mum moments, it is a good ‘all-rounder’, but certainly won’t be winning any cinematic awards anytime soon.

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Kingsman: The Golden Circle

Entertainingly ridiculous, and yet not quite as good as its predecessor.

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Eggsy’s (Taron Egerton) back, and so apparently is Harry (Colin Firth), despite ending the last film with a gunshot wound to the head. A new crisis befalls them in this action-packed sequel, as they must take down a crazed drug lord (Juliann Moore) in an attempt to save the world. In other words, it’s business as usual for the Kingsman, with a little help from their American cousins; The Statesman.

As is the case with most sequels, this film lacks the mystery of the first, which makes for a very predictable storyline laced with lackluster plot turns. Yet, regardless of the stunted excitement, the star-studded cast put a tremendous amount of effort into uplifting this seemingly foreseeable storyline.

With an opening scene crammed fall of computer-generated warmth, the audience is repeatedly gifted with orchestrated action throughout the film, which in some ways makes up for the unimaginative plot that must be suffered.

 

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The Emoji Movie

With Sir Patrick Stewart as a poop emoji and James Corden as a Hi-5 emoji, what could possibly go wrong?

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The answer; Everything.

The very premise of this film was a ridiculous idea to begin with, but that didn’t stop Sony Pictures from making a heavy investment in it.

Despite the quite honestly bafflingly talented cast that have joined forces to voice this movie, the plot remains embarrassingly lack-lustre.

If it wasn’t for James Corden’s comforting British sarcasm that provides comic relief at all the right moments, this film would be a complete right-off.

Though the younger audiences will be falling over each other to reach this cinematic defeat, parents will find the experience headache ridden, but at least it might give them an opportunity for a nap.

Rough Night

A bachelorette to remember, but all for the wrong reasons.

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When a group of girls get together to celebrate their friend’s bachelorette party, things soon go from bad to detrimental as the night quickly meets a very sticky end; that’s not a euphemism.

With Scarlett Johansson heading up this badass girl gang and the likes of Kate McKinnon shortly behind, the standard of acting is well above expectations.

The script too, delights with scenes that are cringeworthy in the best possible way. From inappropriate sex scenarios to using Advil in attempt to resurrect a dead body, this film delights in its ridiculousness.

Whilst the premise of this film is based upon whimsical futility, the film has a whole host of comedic goldmines that leave the audience in stitches of laughter.

 

Baywatch

As comedic crime drama beach spoofs go, this one is just as ridiculous as is to be expected.

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A lifeguards work is never over, especially when you’re an LA County lifeguard, who’s roles apparently encompass the most unlikely of tasks such as undercover crime investigations; just another day at the beach for these guards.

Though David Hasselhoff and Pamela Anderson have had their characters upgraded in the form of Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson and Zac Efron, the basic premise is the same; everyone is astonishingly good looking and the beach crimes are as unrealistic as ever.

Despite an absolutely abysmal string of comedic slow-motion running scenes and face-palm worthy jokes, this film still manages to bring a smile to the faces of its begrudging audience.

The basic plot may be no different to its 1990s crime series counterpart and the special effects may have you cringing in your seats, but there is definitely something lovable about the sheer scale of this films ridiculousness.

Snatched

Amy Schumer is the unlikely daughter of Goldie Hawn on a holiday they’ll never forget.

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Dumped by her boyfriend and eager for travel, Emily (Schumer) finds herself with a spare ticket for an Ecuadorian adventure, so decides to enlist her mother (Hawn) as her plus one; what could possibly go wrong?

Though an unlikely pairing, Schumer and Hawn gloriously unite to provide audiences with a comedic journey like no other. From escaping boobs to drunken shenanigans, not a minute goes by without a laugh, or at worst, a face-palm.

The plot, whilst obviously and completely ridiculous, manages to successfully convey its story whilst providing the much needed comic relief and a worryingly accurate representation of a mother-daughter relationship, which is unwavering in its honesty.

It may not be everyone’s cup of tea for its excessive use of dry humour, but it certainly checks most of the comedy genre boxes.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul

With the general reading age of the book being for ages 8-14, the page to screen adaptation was never destining for cinematic greatness.

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Essentially, a boy named Greg, accompanied by his family, go on a summer road trip together and disaster ensues. 

Yes, you would be right to think this is basically a PG version of We Are The Millers.

As you might expect with a film predominantly aimed at children, the acting is painstakingly awful and at times you could probably have a goat stand-in and it’d have more talent. 

The story is somewhat interesting at best, and the main comedy aspect is best seen from a parental perspective, which showcases how truly terrible and irritating children can be.