King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

A classic tale is turned into an epic adventure as Guy Ritchie sprinkles it with a little magic.

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Though born into royalty, Arthur is brought up in poverty following his parents demise at the hands of his uncle, which leaves him unknowingly carrying greatness upon his shoulders.

Guy Ritchie does what he does best, casting his unique style into the direction of this film; as the plot builds, so does the speed of the action, exhilarating with such vigour, you leave the cinema feeling slightly windswept. But to counteract this feeling of excitement, Ritchie slows down scenes to highlight his classic slow-motion angles, creating stand-out moments at the heart of the action.

The soundtrack, too, is unnervingly accurate, keeping the audiences’ emotions in check throughout the action and into the emotion; as if you’d expect anything but brilliance from the director behind the Sherlock Holmes films.

Though having to withstand David Beckham’s attempt at ‘acting’ for  potentially the longest three minutes of our lives, the rest of the cast exceeds all expectations, showing of their numerous talents and living up to their household names.

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Unlocked

CIA films never get old, but they do, apparently, get longer.

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London is in a terror crisis, and it’s up to CIA agent, Alice Racine, to save the day. But as is the case with so many crime thrillers, such matters are never made easy.

In a plot twist that’s sure to make even Donald Trump double take, conspiracy theories get a whole new meaning as central intelligence gets a little less, well, intelligent.

With a cast that boasts the likes of Michael Douglas and Orlando Bloom, you can only hope for good things, but, alas, that’s about as good as this film gets; safe to say these two will be having harsh words with their management teams.

Despite the best efforts of the script-writers, this film just cannot get it’s feet off the ground, with each anti-climatic scene following the next, it’s a wonder there were so many cinema goers left in their seat by the time the end-credits rolled.

 

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

Star-Lord and his troop are back to guard the galaxy against the most unlikely of predators.

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Since saving the planet and relinquishing their criminal reputations, the guardians have been busy freelancing their skills around the galaxy. But when Quill’s father makes an unexpected appearance, the team must put their business plans on hold.

Despite having a lot to live up to, as sequels go, this film truly does match expectations. The characters have been further developed and the special effects have been given a revamp. Rather than lagging behind, the story has been turbo-boosted with vigour, allowing for the characters to pursue their paths and continue their bond with the audience.

The acting, as is to be expected with such a star-studded cast, is beyond impressive, especially when taking into account the vast majority of it would have been done using green screen; they are in space after all.

What continues to amaze me the most about this franchise is the very fact that the creative team have been able make an audience fall in love with a CGI tree that says just three words: I am Groot.

 

 

 

13 Reasons Why

Now, I’m not usually one for writing series reviews, in fact this goes down as the first, but I cannot help but share how wonderful and thought-consuming the outrageous honesty that prevails in this series is.

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Suicide is a taboo within our society, one which is often veiled with selfish intention or misunderstandings. 13 Reasons Why does not hide behind any misgivings, but rather displays an unrelenting truthfulness that is far too often swept away beneath a metaphorical rug.

The story of this series centres around one girl, Hannah Baker, and what leads her to give up all hope and pursue a course of no return, which ultimately leads to her taking her own life. Along the way, Hannah confesses all the reasons (13 reasons) that lead her to suicide.

Not only does this series tackle the trauma that precedes and proceeds suicide, but it also addresses the problem of rape culture and bullying. These subjects are not simply glossed over, but instead delved into with a revolutionary brutality that makes you feel uncomfortable and uninvited.

The raw truth of this storytelling is unforgiving and shocking, but more importantly is powerful beyond belief, because it refuses to allow you, as the viewer, to be embarrassed or humiliated, but rather empowers a sense of inner righteousness that you can only wish was available to Hannah.

Instead of shying away from what may be considered ‘sensitive material’, the camera angles invite you to watch every emotion of the characters, regardless of the contents nature. At times, the camera almost encourages you to argue it’s invasion, questioning your right to be uncomfortable.

Without the triumph of acting that is displayed throughout the series, the story would not have had the same devastatingly powerful impact upon it’s audience. The cast, which is full of star-studded performers truly excels and sells the story in which they have been tasked with, making sure to approach it with gentle strength and carry it onto the inevitable success it is bound to have.

 

Their Finest

Authenticity, optimism and a dog; what else could you possibly need for a wartime film?

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A married woman and screenwriter find themselves thrown together in a 1940 war-tired Britain as they are commissioned with the dubious task of creating a film worthy of American style propaganda.

Gemma Arterton and Sam Claflin take on the lead roles in this period drama, both of whom manage to fill their roles with heroic integrity and lighthearted humour. Whilst Bill Nighy claims a supporting role; a position which he fills with effortless talent and his ever-so-unique orchestra of hand movements.

The styling and costumes of both set and stars is conveyed with staggering ease, propelling the audience into 1940’s London with an instant glance.

The Direction too is nothing short of magnificent, but nothing else would be expected from Lone Scherfig, the director of similarly natured films such as An Education (2009) and The Riot Club (2014).

Though the story does have relentlessly unpleasant twists, the plot remains humble to its era and clearly everyone involved in the production has ensured the sincerity of the war remained an integral element.

6 Word Movie Tag

Found this really awesome tag over on Through My Eyes, so thought I’d give it a bash.

The rules:

  • Choose 5 movies that you like.
  • Create a 6 word synopsis of the movies.
  • Do include the image provided (no idea what image that’s referring to, so apologies in advance).
  • Tag 5 other bloggers and inform them (probably not going do that).

So, here goes nothing…

Harry Potter – Boy with scar kills evil wizard.

Rocky – Guy boxes a lot, usually wins.

Peter Pan – boy runs away, never grows up.

The Edge of Seventeen – angsty teenage girl hates everyone/everything.

Lord of the Rings – dude goes on quest, finds ring.

I know the whole point of a tag is to well, tag people, but honestly I don’t like to force people into these kind of posts, so I’m just going to leave this open for anyone else to pick up should they wish too.

Peace out and continue to explore cinema.

Table 19

No wedding is complete without a little drama, and this wedding is no exception.

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There’s always that one table at a wedding that is crammed full of weirdos who have been invited out pity, and that is the very subject of this film. Table 19, as you may have guessed by now, is that such table.

From a married couple in turmoil to a teenage boy who’s trying to bag himself a girlfriend, this table has it all.

Though the plot has a great concept behind it, it never seems to reach its full potential, which is no more helped by the often sloppy acting, which is only marginally saved by Anna Kendrick taking centre stage. 

A film that’s entire focus is narrowed to a single table within the wider environment of a wedding is a difficult task and, unfortunately, one that I cannot say was successfully achieved within this attempt, which at most could be described as an experimental defeat.